Seeing the wood for the trees

Visualising “bigger data”

In the blog post Criminal goings-on in a random forest, we used supervised machine learning to see how well we could predict crime in London. We began by rendering and exploring some of the many facets of the recorded crime summary data at London borough-level .

There comes a point though where the many faces of the data require something more than a static visualisation. And there are alternative options. We can make “bigger data” visualisations more consumable and engaging. In this post we’ll go deeper into the original data with a more interactive and flexible approach. Continue reading “Seeing the wood for the trees”

Surprising stories hide in seemingly mundane data

Experimentation with geospatial mapping

Recently I experimented with geospatial mapping techniques in R.  I looked at both static and interactive maps. Embedding the media into a WordPress blog would be simple enough with a static map. The latter would require (for me) a new technique to retain the interactivity inside a blog post.

My web-site visitor log, combined with longitude and latitude data from MaxMind’s GeoLite2, offered a basis for analysis. Although less precise than the GeoIP2 database, this would be more than adequate for my purpose of getting to country and city level.  I settled on the Leaflet package for visualisation given the interactivity and pleasing choice of aesthetics.

The results however were a little puzzling.
Continue reading “Surprising stories hide in seemingly mundane data”

House sales in London SW10 take a few punches

The anatomy of SW10

Analyses of house sales often focus on the wider UK market. In this blog, we’ll take a deep dive into one of London’s more-than 100 postcode districts. We’ll draw on 10,000 property transactions to see how key events have shaped the market. The object of our focus will be SW10 which forms part of the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea.

We’ll start with the anatomy of SW10. Over 80% of property transactions were for leasehold flats.  In contrast, detached freehold properties are a prized scarcity: Only 40 of the circa 10k transactions, over the past 20 years, were for detached properties. Continue reading “House sales in London SW10 take a few punches”

Do G-Cloud categories need a tweak?

Why take a deeper look at G-Cloud categories?

The last blog – “The key to unlocking services on G-Cloud” – touched briefly upon their overlap. And as the concept of G-Cloud categories was newly introduced in the current iteration (G9), it may be worth taking a deeper look at their impact in advance of the next.

So, in this blog, I want to explore the extent and effects of category overlap. And let’s see what insights may be drawn.  For example, are some categories of less value than others?  Could some suppliers gain an advantage? Perhaps by aligning each service to many categories so buyers find them irrespective of their carefully crafted search criteria?

Continue reading “Do G-Cloud categories need a tweak?”

The key to unlocking services on G-Cloud

The importance of keyword-rich descriptions

There are nearly 20,000 services on G-Cloud. Suppliers have strewn their services with G-Cloud keywords designed to grab the attention of buyers. So what should buyers search for, and how does that vary by cloud service category?

Only selected parts of the suppliers’ content are indexed for searching: The service title, a 50-word summary, and bulleted features and benefits. So suppliers must cram in thoughtful keyword-rich phrases to optimise their chances of success.

In this blog, I want to compare and contrast the most frequent keywords used by suppliers. I’ve selected four categories from the Cloud Hosting lot for this purpose: Continue reading “The key to unlocking services on G-Cloud”

Could G-Cloud pricing be simplified?

Background to G-Cloud pricing

The Digital Marketplace is helping those transforming public services by making it simpler, clearer and faster for them to buy what they need. G-Cloud focuses on cloud-based services. Since its launch in 2012, it has evolved through multiple iterations, with the current version being G-Cloud 9.

So, the introduction of a set of categories in G-Cloud 9 provided a natural step forward.  These offered a level of granularity below the three lots of Cloud Hosting, Software and Support. As a result, buyers are able to find and compare groups of suitable products more easily.

Yet there is plenty of opportunity to further simplify the buyer’s task in future G-Cloud iterations. For example, around price comparison. Continue reading “Could G-Cloud pricing be simplified?”